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How to Zone in on 'Most Eligible' Bucks

Big mule deer bucks press younger bucks into their service. For much of the spring, summer and early fall, they stay in "bachelor groups" that can number 10 bucks or more. (Ryan Kirby illustration)
Big mule deer bucks press younger bucks into their service. For much of the spring, summer and early fall, they stay in "bachelor groups" that can number 10 bucks or more. (Ryan Kirby illustration)

Avoid tag soup when targeting Western deer – strategize and scout wisely

After the first morning, when we spooked a bachelor group of four bucks, we didn't see the big one for two more days. We hiked. We glassed. Then, it happened ...

When we topped the hill, he had us pegged. Out there in the waving grass, he watched, every muscle tensed. Without knowing it, we had found his hideout.

And when he broke from cover, he made a mistake. At first, he bounced away with big stiff-legged jumps that put distance between us. He stopped for a moment.

Something like 450 yards, then broke into a run. He ran right into the next canyon and bumped into the other half of our party. We arrived in time to help with the recovery. It was our second glimpse of this buck in three days.

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STARTING SEP 17, 2018
STARTING SEP 17, 2018