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Hunting Military Installations

Many military bases limit hunting to archery only, making crossbows a great option. (Photo courtesy of Aaron Carter)
Many military bases limit hunting to archery only, making crossbows a great option. (Photo courtesy of Aaron Carter)

A primer to hunting white-tailed deer and other wild game on military bases

Though I was anticipating it, I jumped when my name was called. It was 4:30 a.m. at the Radford Army Ammunition Plant (RAAP), and the drawing meant I’d been chosen to experience one of hunting’s Holy Grails. For a deer hunter with limited access to quality private land, the chance to hunt trophy white-tailed deer on one of the many military installations in the United States that allow hunting was a dream come true.

The pool of huntable private lands is drained a little each time a house is erected or a “No Hunting” sign is hung. Rather than bemoan the inevitable, use that energy to retrain your brain to identify the best public properties – including federal lands managed by the U.S. military.

Beyond offering large swaths of land – some spanning more than 100,000 acres – military bases are often teeming with wildlife. And not just any wildlife. Due to the extremely limited hunting, deer and other animals on federal military lands rank among the top trophies out there. Need proof? How about Ken Burnette’s 203 2/8" non-typical whitetail bow kill on Fort Riley (Kansas) or Robert Luke scoring on a 188 4/8" typical buck on the same base.

READ THE FULL STORY ON PETERSEN'S HUNTING

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STARTING SEP 17, 2018
STARTING SEP 17, 2018