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Late-Season Bowhunting Practice is Vitally Important, Tips from Pat Reeve

As the long deer season continues, shooters are tempted to let practice slide. Failure to keep practicing can hide equipment malfunctions or flaws in form, mistakes that could end up ruining a late-season hunter's shot of a lifetime. (Bill Winke photo)
As the long deer season continues, shooters are tempted to let practice slide. Failure to keep practicing can hide equipment malfunctions or flaws in form, mistakes that could end up ruining a late-season hunter's shot of a lifetime. (Bill Winke photo)

Unless you want to endure the heartache of a late-season miss or bad shot with our bow, be sure to work diligently to keep shooting form in tip-top condition, not to mention your bowhunting gear

It's a sad tale heard every year, a shot that was missed as the season winds down, an errant arrow that costs a hunter the chance at a buck he's been dreaming of for months on end.

And sometimes, the tale of woe gets even worse as the shot turns into an errant one, an unleashed arrow that can cause a mortally wounded animal never successfully recovered.

To avoid succumbing to either unwanted scenario, be sure you keep on practicing as the season goes along.

Because for starters, it's just simply a good idea to keep practicing as the season unfolds so that your shooting form remains in top-flight form, not to mention you stay alert to any unwelcome changes happening to your equipment.

And second, doing so will keep you brimming with practiced confidence if Mr. Big does indeed come calling.

Take for instance my longtime North Texas hunting friend, Jim Lillis, a retired Senior Regional Director with Ducks Unlimited.

A few years ago, as he readied for a post-rut hunt on a popular piece of public hunting ground, he made sure he sent a few arrows down range at his Block target the day before his hunt actually began.

After some three dozen shots were launched into the target's bull's eye, he knew his equipment was still dialed in perfectly, not to mention the shooting form he had spent months honing during the warmth of summer and early fall.

The next day, with mid-morning temperatures hovering in the 40s, Lillis was high up in his Lone Wolf treestand when the unmistakable sounds of an approaching deer began to grow from behind his stand location.

Moments later, when a 175 ¼ inch-net typical whitetail walked through a shooting lane, Lillis' shot into the Boone & Crockett Club buck's boiler room was all but automatic and a bit anticlimactic.

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STARTING OCT 15
STARTING OCT 15